FOVEA

to the vector belongs the spoil

The Dot and the Line: A Romance in Lower Mathematics follows the story of a straight line that is enamored with a dot. The key factor in how the animator was able to humanize these characters along with the love story was to use descriptive characteristics, both positive and negative, as well as provide the characters with strong human emotions from insecurity to desire.

Introduced as the “sensible” straight line, he views his complete opposite the dot, as “perfect from beginning to end.” He muscles up enough courage to approach the dot, only to be rejected with such cruel words as “stiff, unconventional, stifled, repressed” as his love frolics with a “wild, fun and uninhibited” squiggle.

Left “rejected, depressed and unhappy”, he tries his hardest to change. After a while he discovers that he can bend into angles, eventually allowing him to create complex shapes, curves and ellipses. After mastering this ability he decides to reproach his love, this time with confidence. He is now viewed as “enlightened, eloquent, profound, and complex.” This shift in her view is coupled with the shift in which she views the squiggle, now “hairy, coarse and graceless.”

The initial rejection and subsequent change of the line in order to please or impress the dot, is a theme, which we have seen in love stories for decades. More so, depicting the Line with a struggle and ultimate self-discovery of his greatness is also a testament to the importance of determination, dedication and self-acceptance. For it is only after this, that he wins her over and they live happily ever after, “or at least reasonably so.”

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This entry was published on April 20, 2009 at 11:43 pm and is filed under animation. Bookmark the permalink. Follow any comments here with the RSS feed for this post.

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